Knicks: Ranking the likelihood of big name offseason acquisitions

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 12: Fred VanVleet #23 of the Toronto Raptors in action against the Brooklyn Nets at Barclays Center on February 12, 2020 in New York City.Brooklyn Nets defeated the Toronto Raptors 101-91. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 12: Fred VanVleet #23 of the Toronto Raptors in action against the Brooklyn Nets at Barclays Center on February 12, 2020 in New York City.Brooklyn Nets defeated the Toronto Raptors 101-91. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images) /
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Sep 2, 2020; Lake Buena Vista, Florida, USA; Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul (3) drives between Houston Rockets guard Russell Westbrook (0) and forward P.J. Tucker (17) during the first half of game seven of the first round of the 2020 NBA Playoffs at ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports /

Most likely offseason acquisition: Chris Paul

If you’ve heard me talk about Chris Paul over the past several weeks, you probably expected this name to rise to the top of the list. I think the Knicks are looking for a player to instantly change the vibe around the team, someone who can help their young players develop, help win them some basketball games, and bring credibility back to the organization.

Say what you want about Chris Paul and the boatloads of money owed to him over the next two seasons, he would check a lot of boxes for team president Leon Rose, who happens to be his former agent, and who reportedly tried to push for a trade to get Paul to New York two summers ago.

The Knicks can use their excess cap space to absorb Paul’s massive salary and reduce the need to send much back to Oklahoma City to make a deal work, both from a financial and fair value standpoint.

The cost associated with acquiring Paul would mostly be borne in his performance on the court—which is sort of strange to say. But if the Knicks are too good next season, but clearly not good enough to compete for anything meaningful, they reduce their lottery odds in a supposedly incredible draft.

For the Knicks, they might be less worried about landing the most ping pong balls than putting the young players already on their roster in a better position to succeed. It’s hard to develop assets on a team that is one of the worst in the league.

Next. 3 options for the 8th overall pick. dark

Oklahoma City is motived to move Paul, the Knicks are the perfect trade partner, it just seems this deal somehow gets done.