New York Knicks: Reasons to love the Tim Hardaway Jr. signing

ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 26: Tim Hardaway Jr. #10 of the Atlanta Hawks looks to pass while being defended by Jae Crowder #99 of the Boston Celtics in Game Five of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Philips Arena on April 26, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 26: Tim Hardaway Jr. #10 of the Atlanta Hawks looks to pass while being defended by Jae Crowder #99 of the Boston Celtics in Game Five of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs at Philips Arena on April 26, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) /
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ATLANTA, GA – OCTOBER 13: Tim Hardaway Jr. #10 of the Atlanta Hawks passes the ball against Tobias Harris #34 of the Detroit Pistons at Philips Arena on October 13, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA – OCTOBER 13: Tim Hardaway Jr. #10 of the Atlanta Hawks passes the ball against Tobias Harris #34 of the Detroit Pistons at Philips Arena on October 13, 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) /

3. Fitting The System

As previously alluded to, Tim Hardaway Jr. would benefit from playing in an offense that pushes the pace and exploits opponents in transition. He would also benefit from playing in a regimented half court offense that outlines his role.

Head coach Jeff Hornacek can provide the ideal balance for Hardaway with a system that would enable him to play to his strengths.

In the half court, Hardaway would be asked to space the floor, attack closeouts, and utilize screens to both score and facilitate. That’s an intriguing truth for a player who has displayed a relatively limited ability to create in isolation.

With a system that enables shooters and straight-line finishers to play to their strengths, Hardaway could build upon his successful 2016-17 campaign.

In New York, Hardaway would be asked to score more—yet, with less responsibility. He could play angles instead of having to utilize his handles to get open.

On the drive, he’s proven to be a capable finisher in the restricted area at 64.0 percent—2.9 percent higher than the league average.

Hornacek’s offense did an excellent job of enabling Gerald Green to capitalize on his shooting and athleticism, and Hardaway could benefit in a similar capacity.